1. africaisdonesuffering:

Vote for Usalama: An Anti-rape Monitoring System
Usalama is a crowdsource location based monitoring system that protects girls and women by utilising sms messages sent from basic cell phones providing real time alerts on occurring dangerous incidents. The aims are to provide safety for women from incidents like rape or danger, and to alert security, health and other stakeholders in the wake of an emergency. An affected individual utilises speed dialing on the phone to send a panic message to network triggering alarm messages (with current time and location data of occurrence) to all the women and important stakeholders registered on the network (within a certain radius of the crime scene) for rapid response. It can also record incidents using the mouthpiece on the phone. The USP is that it works completely on sms on GSM networks using information provided either directly by the telecom operator or using HLR lookups so it isn’t limited by bandwith presence or smartphone use and can therefore easily be deployed to people in rural regions. It is also crowdsourced so it runs itself. It would also have a web app and mobile apps for those with smart phone capabilities. Voice alerts will also available for those who can’t read.
Learn more about Usalama | Show your support and vote for Usalama in the Youth Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition

    africaisdonesuffering:

    Vote for Usalama: An Anti-rape Monitoring System

    Usalama is a crowdsource location based monitoring system that protects girls and women by utilising sms messages sent from basic cell phones providing real time alerts on occurring dangerous incidents. The aims are to provide safety for women from incidents like rape or danger, and to alert security, health and other stakeholders in the wake of an emergency. An affected individual utilises speed dialing on the phone to send a panic message to network triggering alarm messages (with current time and location data of occurrence) to all the women and important stakeholders registered on the network (within a certain radius of the crime scene) for rapid response. It can also record incidents using the mouthpiece on the phone. The USP is that it works completely on sms on GSM networks using information provided either directly by the telecom operator or using HLR lookups so it isn’t limited by bandwith presence or smartphone use and can therefore easily be deployed to people in rural regions. It is also crowdsourced so it runs itself. It would also have a web app and mobile apps for those with smart phone capabilities. Voice alerts will also available for those who can’t read.

    Learn more about Usalama | Show your support and vote for Usalama in the Youth Citizen Entrepreneurship Competition

    (via africaisdonesuffering)

    2 months ago  /  31 notes  /  Source: africaisdonesuffering

  2. wearingraincoats:

So a friend of mine just invited me to this event on Facebook. I am a fan of Doctor Who (though not since Moffat took over as showrunner), but I am also a queer woman and disgusted by this event. As hopefully most of you know, the Day of Silence is held in April of each year, drawing attention to the lack of support that LGBTQ+ people face from bullying, harassment and various abuses. To see that it is being co-opted for a television program sickens me (not to mention that it makes light of people who self-harm). I contacted the creator of this event to voice my concerns, though I haven’t heard back yet. Please don’t let this go unaddressed. A person’s identity and struggle for civil rights should not be bastardized into a sick fan event for a TV show.

    wearingraincoats:

    So a friend of mine just invited me to this event on Facebook. I am a fan of Doctor Who (though not since Moffat took over as showrunner), but I am also a queer woman and disgusted by this event. As hopefully most of you know, the Day of Silence is held in April of each year, drawing attention to the lack of support that LGBTQ+ people face from bullying, harassment and various abuses. To see that it is being co-opted for a television program sickens me (not to mention that it makes light of people who self-harm). I contacted the creator of this event to voice my concerns, though I haven’t heard back yet. Please don’t let this go unaddressed. A person’s identity and struggle for civil rights should not be bastardized into a sick fan event for a TV show.

    3 months ago  /  7 notes  /  Source: wearingraincoats

  3. abortstigma:

Reminder: We’re storming the Internet on June 7th.  Share your stories, show your support in any and all ways, relinquish the suffocating hold the pro-life/anti-choice movement has on people who get abortions and abortion experiences. 
Fight the stigma!

    abortstigma:

    Reminder: We’re storming the Internet on June 7th.  Share your stories, show your support in any and all ways, relinquish the suffocating hold the pro-life/anti-choice movement has on people who get abortions and abortion experiences. 

    Fight the stigma!

    (via pro-choice-or-no-voice)

    3 months ago  /  893 notes  /  Source: abortstigma

  4. snowyfir:

    i hate the whole oppression works both way thing because like

    for instance

    if you go up to your boss and say “YOURE A FUCKING ASSHOLE. YOURE FIRED!!” nothing happens to your boss because you’re not in a position to do anything to her like that. if she goes “NO, YOURE FIRED.” then you’re out on your ass and unemployed. you both said the same thing, but its effects were COMPLETELY different, because of the POSITIONS OF POWER.

    (via yutke)

    3 months ago  /  83,382 notes  /  Source: snowiey

  5. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    3 months ago  /  152,537 notes  /  Source: cloudyskiesandcatharsis

  6. levi-jaeger:

    Can we appreciate John Barrowman? 

    When I met him, I was crying and freaking out, and he was so sweet. 

    He wasn’t supposed to pose for photos but when he saw my uncle trying to take a candid photo, he called him over and he posed with me. 

    He was so sweet when I told him he inspired me to come out, and when I was walking away from his table, he called me back and looked directly up at me and said “I’m proud of you.” 

    He’s amazing.

    3 months ago  /  17 notes  /  Source: agenderhange

  7. I’m not surprised that they’re adopting the language of the anti-slavery movement. It’s what they try to do, to co-opt the language of civil rights, anti-slavery, to assume that they can take the moral high ground while they’re trying to subsume the rights of women—particularly Black women.
    Loretta Ross, on anti-abortion extremists who call themselves ‘abortion abolitionists’

    5 months ago  /  387 notes  /  Source: rhrealitycheck

  8. My Story: Why We Need to End Abortion Stigma

    provoicesupportblog:

    In January, at seven weeks two days, I had an abortion. Since then, I have not been able to tell a single person about my experience, pain, relief, or feelings.

    This Is hard for me, because I am a person who is usually open and honest with my friends and family, and often ask for their advice or support. However, I just can’t bring myself to say “I had an abortion”. I’m so scared. I’m scared what they will think of me. Scared they will judge me. When I see people on social media talking about how people who get abortions are careless, wanted the easy way out, so on, I just want to tell them my experience. That abortion is NOT an easy choice, and all the lessons it has taught me. I do not think I should be ashamed, 1 in 3 women obtain this legal, safe, medical procedure. But I just can’t bring myself to tell them.

    On Monday, I went to the OB GYN. It was the first time I’ve been there since my abortion, and I decided I should tell him, and wanted to ask some questions about fertility and stuff like that. He was a middle aged man, worked at a Catholic Hospital, and also knew my dad. When he asked me if I wanted to ask/ tell him anything, I quietly told “I had an abortion at seven weeks in January”. He nodded, asked if everything had healed OK, but did not say much else

    Later, in the exam room, he came in. He put his hand on my shoulder and said these kind words, ones that I do not think I’ll be able to let go of, and have me in tears right now.

    "Thank you so much for telling me. I know that must of been really traumatic for you. I’m so thankful you were honest with me and I know it was hard. I’m not here to judge you, just to make sure I can help in any way I can" . He told me when I am ready to have children, I should have no problems, and to not listen to the pro-life antics and "medical facts".

    His kindness gives me courage to be more honest about my experience. However, it makes me sad that the only person I can be 100% honest with is a stranger. People do not realize how their unkind (and often untrue) antics about abortion effect a person, and how it prevents them from being able to give an honest voice about the topic.

    5 months ago  /  56 notes  /  Source: provoicesupportblog

  9. If you are considering an abortion…

    protego-et-servio:

    My inbox is open!  

    I had an abortion last year and I’m a mother to a 2.5 year old.  If you have any questions or just need someone to talk to, my inbox is always open.  I’m upfront about my experiences and I’m more than happy to give you ideas as to what pregnancy, labor, and abortion are truly like.

    5 months ago  /  14 notes  /  Source: protego-et-servio

  10. Stop.

    anthr0apologist:

    Quit it with the philosophical arguments against abortion.

    Quit it with the “but if you think of it this way…” queries.

    Quit it with the not-so-clever quips against pro-choicers.

    You aren’t innovative, creative, or clever, and no debate about religion, adoption, altruism, claims that “you consented to pregnancy because you had sex,” “rape is a gift from God,” or “the body has ways of shutting that down” is going to convince me that, if I were to become pregnant before I was ready to bear children, I should have to revolve my life for more than a single day around a pregnancy that I don’t want to have.

    I only have one life to live and I will not spend it discomforted, panicked, restricted, shameful or for someone else because of other people’s notion of what I should have to do with my life.

    5 months ago  /  8 notes  /  Source: anthr0apologist

  11. lastchancepack:

    I am pro choice It doesn’t mean I condone murder but I rather be aborted than live in a world where my mother can’t raise me right or is not ready.
    (Haters say: then dont have sex)
    True true that’s a good point and responsible but hey condoms ( and birth-control “the pill”) only work 86% of the time and people who are safe with a condom may get a girl pregnant anyway
    Don’t say well god wanted this baby to live
    No just no

    Pro choice

    5 months ago  /  5 notes  /  Source: lastchancepack

  12. cake-and-grief-counseling:

    there’s a difference between exercising your freedom of speech and assembly, and verbally and physically harassing people attempting to access legal healthcare services

    5 months ago  /  329 notes  /  Source: officialbisexual

  13. your-lies-ruin-lives:

*Note that not only women can get pregnant. **Used with permission of the creator. 

    your-lies-ruin-lives:

    *Note that not only women can get pregnant. 
    **Used with permission of the creator. 

    5 months ago  /  72 notes  /  Source: your-lies-ruin-lives